All Hell is Breaking Loose, Honey / Tout se pète la gueule, chérie
Frédérick Gravel
Saturday, October 7
LSPU Hall, 8pm

Photo by Dave St-Pierre

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All Hell is Breaking Loose, Honey

This is folk tale of distraught men, the ordinary run-of-the-mill North American male –- beer, T-shirts, baseball caps, cowboy boots, beer bellies and their hesitations, outbursts of violence, confusion, brusque changes of mood, right left, front and back, lurching in a drunken haze of beer and powerlessness.

Frédérick Gravel takes on the confusion of the contemporary American male, whether he hails from a bland suburb, a country road or a cowboy movie. His choreographies are patchworks of component scenes, showcases presented in “best of” concert fashion, deconstructed and constantly evolving. He delights in exposing the inner workings of both the theatrical machine and the machinery of the emotions. With his chronic irreverence, Gravel aims for dance that is not snobbish, dance that casually contains several levels of intelligence without being complicated. The music is performed live, the scratching of dirty chords. The lighting is vibrant, and the piece plays with irony and distancing (source: Festival TransAmériques)

Credits

Concept and direction: Frédérick Gravel / Grouped’ArtGravelArtGroup
Dancers and musicians: Nicolas Cantin, Dany Desjardins, Tomas Furey, Frédérick Gravel
Dancers and musicians at creation: Stéphane Boucher, Nicolas Cantin, Frédérick Gravel, Dave St-Pierre
Original Music: Stéphane Boucher
Light: Alexandre Pilon-Guay
Sound: Sean Austin
Dramaturgy: Katya Montaignac
Rehearsal director: Anne Lebeau (at creation), Jamie Wright (at rerun)
Artistic advisors: Ivana Milicevic, Anne Lebeau, Claude Poissant, Hugo Gravel
Production: Frédérick Gravel and Daniel Léveillé Danse
Coproduction: Festival TransAmériques in collaboration with Place des Arts ; Rencontres chorégraphiques internationales de Seine-Saint-Denis
Studio: Steptext Dance Project, et la Place des Arts
Development agents: Marie-Andrée Gougeon; George Skalkogiannis
With the support of: Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec; Canada Arts Council

This production receives administrative/development support from Daniel Léveillé Danse company (Montréal) as part of its sponsorship project.

Bio

The choreographer, dancer, musician and lighting designer Frédérick Gravel turns the structures of choreography upside down, merging into his work various elements from rock and performance art. Advocating the intermingling of cultures and disciplines, the works of Frédérick Gravel are created in close collaboration with all members of Grouped’ArtGravelArtGroup (GAG), a shifting collective of dancers and musicians. His productions Gravel Works (2009), Usually Beauty Fails (2012), This Duet That We’ve Already Done (so many times) (2015) have received great national and international reviews. He co-created with the author Étienne Lepage Ainsi parlait… (2013) and Logique du pire (2016). In February 2015, he revisited the cabaret style at Usine C, presenting Cabaret Gravel with 20 guest artists, including Dear Criminals and the Molinari Quartet. Always present where least expected, he collaborated with Pierre Lapointe on Mutantès (2008).

Press Quotes:

“A show that exacerbates the beauty of the complaint as the cry, howl desperate and beautiful from the injured animal.”
– Paris Art, Paris

“This masculine collapse is powerful and beautiful because it is not imposed from the exterior. It asserts itself in a show where men lay bare with a sensibility and a sense of self-analysis and self-deprecation that saves them. And the show’s finale, presented as an encore, bears witness to this!” – Le Devoir, Montreal.

“ ‘Please beer with us!’ … males are a sorry sight in Tout se pète la gueule chérie. But they nonetheless offer us a very pleasant evening. The group’s pleasure of performing on stage is absolutely contagious.” – DF Danse, Montreal.

“This is a series of scenes presenting tavern-man, ape-man, excessive-man and violent-man. Man inexorably submitted to the force of gravity. Powerful and intense scenes that call out for our attention despite their apparent simplicity and their obvious and deliberate imperfections. Scenes with blunt lighting, and very loud and indelicate music – like the show’s different characters and the males that incarnate them.”- Voir, Montreal.